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Meet characters from Slovak legends

A new exhibition introduces well-known Slovak characters and their environments.

(Source: Dano Veselský, TASR)

Fairy-tale characters from various Slovak legends such as witches, ghosts or devils are the theme of a new interactive exhibition called Boo Booh or The Scariest Slovak Monsters.

“Despite the scary name of the exhibition, our aim was not to only frighten children,” said Ingrid Abrahamfyová, the author of the exhibition’s theme, as cited by the TASR newswire. The aim of the exhibition was to introduce characters from Slovak legends to children and adults, she added.

“We chose well-known characters and create environments for them where they live,” explained the author of the exhibition for TASR. The exhibition consists of a house, meadow, forest, cemetery, and mill as well as underground. The characters are both good and evil, men and women,and even animals.

Visitors to the exhibition meet a snake who is a good protector of houses or nightmares and a bad imp living in mill. It is also possible to sit on a dragon or to watch dwarfs work underground.

The exhibition will be accessible for the public until March 2018 in Bibiana, The International House of Art for Children.

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