Archaeological research at Čičva castle revealed connecting corridor

The castle also belonged to Elizabeth Báthory, the Bloody Countess.

Čičva castleČičva castle (Source: Milan Kapusta, TASR)
More information about travelling in Slovakia
Please see our Spectacular Slovakia travel guide.

This year’s archaeological research at Čičva castle in eastern Slovakia revealed a connecting corridor between the northern and western palace wing.

Its vault is created by bricks that were mostly used in Poland, which makes them a rare find, explains Ľubomír Hutka, head of citizens' association Pro Futuro linked to the castle Čičva.

SkryťRemove ad
Article continues after video advertisement
SkryťRemove ad
Article continues after video advertisement

This architecture was very rare in Slovakia, according to him.

“Drugeth’s family owned the castle in the 17th century and brought their Polish crew here,” he said, as quoted by the TASR newswire, adding that this may explain the vault construction made from bricks.

The first phase of reconstruction of the eastern cannon bastion has started this year as well.

“We succeeded in building the first floor where two cannon loopholes are preserved,” said Huťka for TASR.

Loopholes were damaged and the northern and southern wall was so statically desolated that it was necessary to renovate them as soon as possible, Hutka added, mentioning the work may be finished next year.

Archaeological research also revealed other ceramics, jugs, bowls and two broken stone cannonballs.

“The biggest rarity was the discovery of a part of ring armour,” he said, as cited by TASR, explaining that it was not so common because its production cost a fortune and only important, rich knights and noblemen could afford it. He added that the castle Čičva was probably very significant in the past.

SkryťRemove ad

The first written reference about the castle is from 1316. It used to belong to the Báthory family once, as Elizabeth Báthory, the legendary Bloody Countess, gained it as dowry when marrying František Nádašdy.

The Pro Futuro association has been trying to save the national cultural monument castle Čičva since 2014.

Top stories

Illustrative stock photo

It's not just whales and pandas that need saving, Slovak researchers stress

How far has science come in Slovakia in the 30 years since the end of Czechoslovakia?


9 h
Aaron King in the grounds of the Cambridge International School in Bratislava with his family, wife Loredana, son Octavian and daughters Annabelle and Alexandra.

Getting young people to think outside the box

Embracing Slovak culture and society at Cambridge International School.


30. jan
Children's Commissioner Jozef Mikloško (r), speaking during a press conference.

News digest: Slovak children anxious over poverty and bad relationships

Municipalities plan a street-light protest, general prosecutor does not plan to run in presidential election. Learn more in today's news digest.


21 h
SkryťClose ad