Archaeologists find human skull in the centre of Nitra

Ceramics, pipes, a bone bodkin, needles and also tiny metal findings were also unearthed.

Illustrative stock photoIllustrative stock photo(Source: TASR/Branislav Caban)

Archaeologists have made discoveries covering several eras during rescue research linked to construction work at the site of the former Orbis House of Culture in the centre of Nitra.

The research began in January and the construction of the Orbis Premium was started at the end of April. Among the most interesting findings was a human skull, found in a settlement refuse pit. The rest of the skeleton was unearthed at a different site.

Read also:Archaeologists made some unusual discoveries near Levice Read more 

“Despite intense construction in the 70’s and 80’s of the last century in this part of Nitra, we succeeded in finding 40 archaeological objects that fit with the settlement character, mainly in settlement middens and the remains of the cellars on Piaristická street,” informed František Žák Matyasowszky, a director of the Archaeological Agency, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

Many more findings

The artifacts originated from three eras – the 11th - 12th centuries, the 17th – 18th centuries and the 19th – 20th centuries. Various ceramics, such as pots, jugs and pans and also the remains of bones, pipes, a bone bodkin and needles but also tiny metal findings were unearthed.

Read also:Archaeologists find hundred-year-old fork Read more 

“Currently, we are working on processing all the archaeological finds. This involves cleaning, documentation, preserving, analysis and seeking expert opinions,” Žák Matyasowszky said, as quoted by SITA, adding that the findings would hopefully bring new information about the history of Nitra.

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Theme: Archaeology


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