Spectacular Slovakia #40: What do Slovakia and Scandinavia have in common?

It has something to do with four articular Lutheran churches in Slovakia. Listen to the latest episode below to find out more.

The articular Lutheran church in Kežmarok. The articular Lutheran church in Kežmarok. (Source: Peter Dlhopolec)

As the reformation movement expanded across Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries, the Catholic Habsburg empire, which included Slovakia, began to oppress Protestants. Although reluctantly, Emperor Leopold I eventually allowed them to build their churches under strict conditions scribbled in Article 25 and 26.

Listen to the episode:

Protestant Scandinavians are believed to have helped build the articular Lutheran churches in Slovakia. Although there are only a few today, Sunday church service, weddings and baptisms are still held in these churches.

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