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HISTORY TALKS...

Nové Zámky

THE TOWN of Nové Zámky has a turbulent history. It started as a 16th-century fortress (hence the name "Zámky") to defend against the Ottomans, but eventually fell to their attacks.

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THE TOWN of Nové Zámky has a turbulent history. It started as a 16th-century fortress (hence the name "Zámky") to defend against the Ottomans, but eventually fell to their attacks. After two decades of Turkish rule, it was captured by the Hungarian Monarchy. And years after that, it became a base for anti-Habsburg rebels.

One story from Nové Zámky's years of Turkish occupation centres on Ján Bottyán, who is considered a hero for sneaking in via the Nitra River, which flows behind the town, and throwing a praying imam from the fortress' tower. Bottyán then narrowly escaped through a drawbridge.

In the 18th century, rebels seized Nové Zámky and built a stone dam that could flood the town, if needed.

And later, as a town started to develop around the fortress, the Kaiser Court in Vienna ordered the fortress walls be demolished, so Nové Zámky would never pose a threat again.

This postcard shows Nové Zámky in 1933. The Nitra River is in the background.


By Branislav Chovan

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