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Remiaš killing linked to Slovak secret service

Following Slovak Information Service Director Vladimír Mitro's decision on February 24 to declassify his parliamentary report on the operations of the secret service during the 1994-1998 Mečiar era, the daily paper Sme printed those parts of the report that could be made public. What follows is excerpted from that report.
Immediately after the abduction of [the son of the former President] Michal Kováč Jr. to Austria, several measures were applied to hide SIS participation in this operation. Code names of SIS agents and identification signs on those cars which were used in the operation against Kováč Jr. were changed frequently.

Following Slovak Information Service Director Vladimír Mitro's decision on February 24 to declassify his parliamentary report on the operations of the secret service during the 1994-1998 Mečiar era, the daily paper Sme printed those parts of the report that could be made public. What follows is excerpted from that report.


Immediately after the abduction of [the son of the former President] Michal Kováč Jr. to Austria, several measures were applied to hide SIS participation in this operation. Code names of SIS agents and identification signs on those cars which were used in the operation against Kováč Jr. were changed frequently.

The above mentioned security measures were also supposed to mar the investigation of the Kováč Jr. case. The SIS director [Ivan Lexa] marred the police investigation significantly by ignoring all requests by legal bodies to relieve the SIS agents involved in the case of their oath to remain silent. He also refused to allow police inspection of the SIS headquarters [where the cars used for the kidnapping were hidden]... Moreover, Lexa through the Interior Ministry influenced the investigation, so that the SIS participation in the kidnapping would not be revealed... One of the measures intended to mar the investigation was that a senior SIS officer was planted on a police investigation team which was handling the Kováč abduction.

They provoked and attacked

In an attempt to thwart the investigation of the Kováč Jr. case and to prevent the disclosure of SIS participation in the case, several people such as J. Šimunič, P. Vačok [head police investigators on the case, both of whom were removed from the case on the demands of Lexa and Mečiar], Ján Havlát [Kováč's lawyer], Peter Tóth [an investigative reporter for the Sme daily paper], Robert Remiáš [the contact person to SIS informant Oscar Fegyveres], the parents and siblings of Oskar Fegyveres [the SIS officer who confessed to participation in the Kováč abduction, and who was later granted an amnesty by President Michal Kováč] and many others, all were kept under surveillance and files were kept on them. SIS agents initiated an act of provocation against Vačok to dicredit his person and have him recalled from the case. One SIS officer even physically attacked reporter Peter Tóth to intimidate him. SIS headquarters prepared other operations to prove that the abduction of Kováč Jr. was in fact a self-kidnapping. For this purpose, the SIS found a former police officer, Jozef D., and other witnesses, who gave false testimony to the police investigator and were also interviewed on the state STV television station.

Why did Remiáš die?

Despite the fact that all SIS activities intended to keep secret SIS participation in the Kováč case were unsuccessful, the SIS leadership decided to find and silence Oskar Fegyeveres. Therefore, the head officer of the SIS sent five agents on a mission to Switzerland in January 1997. The agents were supposed to find out where Oskar Fegyeveres lived and worked. When the head of the mission announced to [Bratislava headquarters] that all necessary information about Oskar Fegyeveres had been collected, the SIS head officer [in Bratislava] instructed the agents to return to Slovakia, and told the mission chief to stay in Switzerland and await another group of agents.

Because the agents of this [second] group were convinced that Oskar Fegyeveres would have to be assassinated, they returned to Bratislava claiming a lack of information necessary to complete their mission. These SIS agents feared killing Oskar Fegyeveres in Switzerland, probably in connection with the tragic fate of Robert Remiáš, who died after a bomb placed in his car exploded on April 29, 1996. There are a number of pieces of evidence to prove that the SIS was behind Remiáš's death. The telephone in his apartment was tapped by the SIS from November 14, 1995 until the day of his assassination. Remiáš was also kept under surveillance, even on the day when his car blew up.

There is also evidence that proves that the SIS attempted to conceal its participation in Remiáš's death. Principally, this proof lies in the fact that SIS officers [...] gave false testimony to police investigators on the instructions of the SIS head officer [...]. Moreover, their preparation for rendering the false testimony was supervised by the SIS director [Lexa] himself.

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