Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Government recommends bill to limit MPs' immunity

The Slovak Government on January 16 recommended that Parliament pass a constitutional amendment that would abolish MPs' immunity from prosecution for misdemeanors, but stopped short of approving the measure, which requires the support of at least 90 lawmakers in the 150-seat Parliament. The bill, if passed, would force MPs to submit to breath tests when suspected of drunk driving, and would allow prosecution for illegal parking or speeding.

The Slovak Government on January 16 recommended that Parliament pass a constitutional amendment that would abolish MPs' immunity from prosecution for misdemeanors, but stopped short of approving the measure, which requires the support of at least 90 lawmakers in the 150-seat Parliament. The bill, if passed, would force MPs to submit to breath tests when suspected of drunk driving, and would allow prosecution for illegal parking or speeding.

The measure, which has been proposed by main coalition party Smer-SD MPs Pavol Paška, Miroslav Číž and Mojmír Mamojka, will be voted on at the next parliamentary session in January. Apart from Smer, it is backed by the three opposition parties in Parliament - SDKÚ-DS, the ethnic-Hungarian SMK and the Christian Democrats (KDH). The coalition partners ĽS-HZDS and the SNS stand opposed. The debate on Smer's legislative proposal was originally scheduled for December, but was postponed until January at the request of SNS legislator Rafael Rafaj, who cited the need to study more of the legal rules that would be affected. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Sentenced!

It is definitely good news that at least one emblematic scandal did not end in vain.

Minister Igor Štefanov was sacked over a scandal.

British PM: We are not treating EU nationals as bargaining chips

Open letter of Theresa May to EU citizens in the UK.

Theresa May

Do you want a Sagan for your Lego collection? Photo

The post is very popular on Facebook.

Peter Sagan

Why did we have to wait ten years for the verdict in the bulletin-board case?

The case is still not concluded. The Supreme Court will have to deal with the appeal of ex-ministers; the case of embezzlement by the non-licensed banking institution of Jozef Majský has also become protracted.

Ex-minister Janušek, sentenced October 18.