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INEKO attributes economic growth to reforms of 2002-2006

Independent economic analysts in Slovakia are convinced that the reforms carried out in 2002-2006 are the driving force of the country's current record economic growth.

Independent economic analysts in Slovakia are convinced that the reforms carried out in 2002-2006 are the driving force of the country's current record economic growth.

The non-governmental think tank INEKO surveyed eighteen economic analysts who said that measures taken between 2002 and 2006 created 41 percent to the current economic growth, the SITA newswire wrote.

During this period, Slovakia started reforms of its tax system, labour market, pension system, health care, consolidated its public finances and entered the ERM II exchange rate mechanism.

In contrast, analysts perceive steps of the current government since 2006 rather negatively. They think that changes made to the health sector, modifications to the tax reform and the amendment to the Labour Code from the year 2007 decreased economic growth potential by four percent. Their only praise was for the government’s management of Slovakia's euro-zone entry, which attributed four percent to the current growth.

Compiled by Jana Liptáková from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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