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Kubiš delivers wide-ranging speech at UN Human Rights Council

Foreign Affairs Minister Jan Kubiš delivered a speech at United Nation's Human Rights Council in Geneva on March 3 emphasizing co-operation between the UN and the Council of Europe as well as issues such as banning torture and the protection of minorities' languages.

Foreign Affairs Minister Jan Kubiš delivered a speech at United Nation's Human Rights Council in Geneva on March 3 emphasizing co-operation between the UN and the Council of Europe as well as issues such as banning torture and the protection of minorities' languages.

"It was both technical and political discussion," SLOVAKIA was told by Kubiš, who is currently the chairman of Council of Europe's Committee of Ministers.

Kubiš said that the UN Human Rights Council is still a relatively new body and, even though it has already built its institutions, it can't be assumed how the discussion on individual problematic issues will develop. At bilateral meetings in Geneva, Kubiš met his Slovenian counterpart Dimitrij Rupel, as well as his Serbian and Macedonian counterparts Vuk Jeremic and Antonio Milososki. Kubiš also met UN Office in Geneva general director Sergei Ordzhonikidze.

On March 4, Kubiš will take part in a seminar that concerns reforms in the security sector as well as take in a conference on disarmament.

"I will try again to put forward an impetus within the framework of this conference as it's a unique forum for issues concerning the supervision of armament and disarmament," said Kubiš, adding that currently this is a sphere that doesn't function the way it should and new initiatives are not forthcoming.

Kubiš added that he would continue in bilateral meetings during which he will lobby for electing Slovakia as UN Human Rights Council's member country from 2008-2011.

"The vote is expected to take place in New York in May," said Kubiš. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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