Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

BUSINESS IN SHORT

Slovaks avoid their dentists

LAST year Slovaks failed to use up all the funds allocated by health insurers for preventive dental checks. The health insurance companies reported that more than Sk500 million of allocated funds were unused, the ČTK newswire wrote.

LAST year Slovaks failed to use up all the funds allocated by health insurers for preventive dental checks. The health insurance companies reported that more than Sk500 million of allocated funds were unused, the ČTK newswire wrote.

In Slovakia, insured adult patients can go for one free dental check per year. Health insurers cover two free checks for children. The insurers cover part of dental treatments for those who visit the dentist at least once a year. However, those who fail to undergo a preventive check are obliged to pay the full cost of any dental treatment they need during the following year.

The largest insurance company, Všeobecná Zdravotná Poisťovňa (VsŽP) reported that only about 1.5 million of its almost 3 million clients went to dentists for a preventive check last year. Its total costs for checks amounted to Sk321 million, Petra Balážová, the VsŽP spokesperson told ČTK.

Dôvera, the second largest insurer, reported about 436,000 free checks although the insurer had allowed for a total of 970,000. Other insurers experienced a similar situation.

Ján Gašič, the President of the Slovak Chamber of Dentists, says he is not happy about the interest Slovaks take in their dental health. Even though the number of preventive checks has been increasing, hundreds of thousands of people still avoid dentists. He estimates that in 2006 about 70 percent of people went to their dentists for check-ups, pointing out that some don't have contracts with any health insurer and therefore pay for the treatment themselves.

Dentists repeatedly call on people to get check-ups since preventive dental care is particularly effective.

Top stories

New legislation protects creditors from unfair mergers

Fraudulent mergers were a legal business model enabling unfair businesses to get rid of debts

Tightening conditions when merging companies will increase the red tape of lawful mergers and prolong this procedure.

Blog: How long until a robot takes your job?

Are robots really taking over? What are the benefits and what are the risks?

Illustrative stock photo

EMA will go to Amsterdam, not Bratislava

The Slovak capital finished fourth in first round of vote for the seat of the prestigious European Medicines Agency

EMA will move from London due to Brexit. It will go to Amsterdam.

They reported corruption at the Foreign Ministry. Now they receive an award

The tenth year of the White Crow award, celebrating young people and activists who break prejudices and go against the tide.

White Crow award laureates