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Press Code critics will go unheeded, says daily

The Pravda daily on April 17 reports that protests against the new Press Code will go unanswered, according to the SITA newswire. It says that Slovak President Ivan Gašparovič intends to sign the Press Code into law, despite an ever-lengthening list of organisations asking him not to do so. Several of the protests have come from abroad. Slovak publishers, the Slovak Syndicate of Journalists and the heads of the five most important Czech periodicals have all called on the president to veto the law. In particular, they are critical of the so-called right of reply. The Czech journalists point out that the right of reply is applied in the Czech Republic only in cases where false information has been published. SITA

The Pravda daily on April 17 reports that protests against the new Press Code will go unanswered, according to the SITA newswire. It says that Slovak President Ivan Gašparovič intends to sign the Press Code into law, despite an ever-lengthening list of organisations asking him not to do so. Several of the protests have come from abroad. Slovak publishers, the Slovak Syndicate of Journalists and the heads of the five most important Czech periodicals have all called on the president to veto the law. In particular, they are critical of the so-called right of reply. The Czech journalists point out that the right of reply is applied in the Czech Republic only in cases where false information has been published. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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