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Russian Atomstroyexport to process Slovakia's radioactive waste

The Russian joint-stock company Atomstroyexport is going to process Slovakia's radioactive waste in its facility in Sosnovyi Bor for over €5.4 million.

The Russian joint-stock company Atomstroyexport is going to process Slovakia's radioactive waste in its facility in Sosnovyi Bor for over €5.4 million.

The state-run Jadrová Vyraďovacia Spolocnosť (JAVYS) signed the contract on radioactive waste processing with the Russian company at the end of this March. Based on the contract, Atomstroyexport will process a maximum of 730 tonnes of contaminated radioactive waste for JAVYS using a method of controlled re-melting. According to information published in the European Public Procurement Journal, the contract also includes securing radioactive waste transport to the processing locality and transport of processed waste back to JAVYS.

As of April 1, 2006, GovCo, which took over operation of the V1 NPP following the cabinet's decision to privatise 66 percent of the V1 NPP's previous operator, the SE power utility, was renamed JVS. GovCo was established on July 6, 2005 and its sole shareholder is the state, as represented by the Economy Ministry. In addition to the V1 Nuclear Power Plant, GovCo has taken over the responsibility of decommissioning nuclear facilities and handling nuclear waste and expended nuclear fuel. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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