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Göncz bemoans two-track communication from Slovak politicians

Slovak-Hungarian relations have improved to previously unseen levels, but Slovak politicians use two-track communication, Hungarian Foreign Minister Kinga Göncztold reporters in Budapest on June 12.

Slovak-Hungarian relations have improved to previously unseen levels, but Slovak politicians use two-track communication, Hungarian Foreign Minister Kinga Göncz
told reporters in Budapest on June 12.

Co-operation in business, research and education is expanding between both countries, but there is a problem in Slovakia that its ruling coalition includes a party, specifically the SNS, whose most important issue is its anti-Hungarianism, coupled with anti-Roma and anti-German stance (without making a direct reference).

The governing coalition and government make repeated comments that are offensive to Hungarians, she said. Hungary has repeatedly cautioned the Slovak political elite now in power about its two-track communication: perpetual anti-Hungarian statements on one the hand, and invitations for dialogue and co-operation, on the other. The minister said she continued to hold very regular meetings with her Slovak counterpart Ján Kubiš and that the countries' PMs do likewise. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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