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Bratislava's message to tourists: behave - we're watching you

BRATISLAVA city police are ramping up security measures to deal with unruly tourists in the capital, said Bratislava's Deputy Mayor Tomáš Korček, who has responsibility for the city police, the SITA newswire reported.

BRATISLAVA city police are ramping up security measures to deal with unruly tourists in the capital, said Bratislava's Deputy Mayor Tomáš Korček, who has responsibility for the city police, the SITA newswire reported.

Police patrols will increase during weekends, in response to the number of tourists visiting Bratislava. Extra patrols will also take place during the week when there are public holidays or other festivities taking place.

Police facilities, including the Central Control Camera System will also be improved.
Korček told SITA anyone witnessing or subject to criminal behaviour should dial 159 in order to report it. A police patrol would then be sent to investigate.

During the upcoming summer season, patrols by not only the city police, but also the railway, border and 'foreign' police forces will be enhanced, said Korček.

He said the system showed results last year, with police statistics show that the number of offences and thefts has been decreasing in Bratislava.

Bratislava City Council and the foreign police estimate that about 500 English-speaking people visit the capital each weekend.

They said that visitors often mistakenly believed the city was a 'no limits' destination, and said their offences included harassing young girls and bathing naked in fountains, often intoxicated.

The current season, according to Korček, has shown that measures against such offences from the previous year have been effective.

According to council statistics , 735,000 people visited Bratislava last year, a rise of 7 percent compared to 2006.

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