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Slovakia losing investment into renewable energy sources

Slovakia is losing investors who could invest into renewable energy sources because of unstable legislation in the sector.

Slovakia is losing investors who could invest into renewable energy sources because of unstable legislation in the sector.

In contrast to neighbouring countries, fixed prices for electricity generated from renewable energy sources have been set only for a year, which complicates receiving external funding sources for such investments, explained Peter Laco, a manager at the KPMG consulting services department. According to a KPMG analysis, fixed tariffs schemes, in which the government guarantees a fixed price of electricity generated from renewable energy technologies (RETs) for a longer period, are essential to attracting investors.

According to Peter Kiss, director of the KPMG center for energy and network industries in the CEE region, it is most likely that companies will invest in renewable energy sources in Poland, Romania, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Slovenia and Bulgaria. He thinks that the energy sector has been somewhat neglected by investors, who have probably not yet recognised the unique investment opportunities in renewable energy sources in Central and
Eastern Europe. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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