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Four cases of illegal waste transport uncovered

The Slovak Environment Inspectorate (SIŽP) has investigated six cases of suspected illegal cross-border transport of waste this year, Jarmila Durdovičová chief inspector of SIŽP's department of waste management, told the TASR newswire on August 4.

The Slovak Environment Inspectorate (SIŽP) has investigated six cases of suspected illegal cross-border transport of waste this year, Jarmila Durdovičová chief inspector of SIŽP's department of waste management, told the TASR newswire on August 4.

The inspectors uncovered an attempt to transport waste plastic packaging illegally to Germany at the border between Čunovo (Bratislava region) and Rajka (Hungary). The Inspectorate also investigated the activities of five Slovak entities exporting paper, plastic and waste accumulators, discovering that the regulations had been broken in three cases.

"Illegal cross-border waste transportation is a very sensitive topic. Even with the best efforts and checking procedures it's impossible to prevent it from happening," said Durdovičová.

In 2007, permits were granted for 155 waste imports, 25 waste exports and 11 waste transits. Slovakia can be a destination country for waste only if the imported materials are processed, and not simply dumped or burned in incinerators. Those who break the regulations risk fines of up to Sk5 million (€165,000).

The Inspectorate uncovered nine attempts to transport waste illegally into Slovak territory last year. These cases involved paper, plastic and tyres that came mainly from Hungary. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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