Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

CULTURE SHORTS...

Foreigners come to learn Slovak

MORE than 150 foreign students have gathered inBratislava to improve their Slovak language skills at the 44th Studia Academica Slovaca (SAS) .Over the next three weeks, Hungarians, Germans, Italians, Syrians, Taiwanese and Cubans will attend lectures, concerts, theatre performances, see exhibitions and travel to become familiarised with Slovak language and culture.

MORE than 150 foreign students have gathered inBratislava to improve their Slovak language skills at the 44th Studia Academica Slovaca (SAS) .Over the next three weeks, Hungarians, Germans, Italians, Syrians, Taiwanese and Cubans will attend lectures, concerts, theatre performances, see exhibitions and travel to become familiarised with Slovak language and culture.

This year's range of students is similar to that of previous years: university students, foreign language teachers, translators, business people, and students with Slovak relatives or friends.

SAS teachers say it is difficult to determine which nations have the most trouble learning Slovak. Spaniards find the pronunciation of the consonants č, ž and š difficult, while Japanese and Chinese are not able to distinguish between r and l.

“Hungarians have dificulties with Slovak sentence structure,” Eva Španková from SAS told the SITA newswire.

On the basis of entry tests, students are divided into groups of beginners, intermediate and advanced students. At the end of the semester, the students will be given final tests to determine their level of achievement. All students will receive a certificate of participation.

Besides language studies, other activities are included to help the foreign students get a taste of Slovak culture and history. Films, including the documentary Blind Loves and the recent big hit Bathory, will be screened.

The students will also be able to participate in folk singing and dancing.


Top stories

Gilden: Take the negative and make a positive from it Photo

The works of New York native, photographer Bruce Gilden, who has worked for five decades in the streets of the biggest cities, are on exhibit in the Kunsthalle (House of Arts) in Bratislava.

Bruce Gilden: Feast of San Gennero, Little Italy, 1984.

The ongoing struggle for a free and democratic Slovakia

The people of Slovakia deserve the credit for the remarkable progress that this country has made over the past twenty-five years, US ambassador writes.

Illustrative stock photo

Foreigners: Top 10 events in Bratislava Video

Tips for the top 10 events in the capital between November 24 and December 3, plus regular services in different languages, training, temporary exhibitions and highlights of the year.

Christmas Markets Bratislava

Robert Fico has lost the electoral magic he once had Plus

But his party can still bounce back if they do the things that make parties resilient.

Robert Fico claims that Smer won the regional elections because it is the party with the most chairs in regional councils.