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Government approves tighter controls over attendance in parliament

Checks on MPs' attendance at parliamentary sessions, which are currently based solely on signatures, are set to become stricter after an amendment to a parliamentary law proposed by Parliamentary Chairman Pavol Paška and Miroslav Číž (both Smer-SD) was approved by the government on September 17. The proposal will come into force on November 1 if it is approved. According to the proposed rules, it won't be possible to forge another MP's signature on the attendance sheet, as each sheet will be checked by a verifier who will guarantee the legitimacy of the signatures. Disciplinary action may be taken if an MP falsifies his or her colleague's signature.

Checks on MPs' attendance at parliamentary sessions, which are currently based solely on signatures, are set to become stricter after an amendment to a parliamentary law proposed by Parliamentary Chairman Pavol Paška and Miroslav Číž (both Smer-SD) was approved by the government on September 17.

The proposal will come into force on November 1 if it is approved. According to the proposed rules, it won't be possible to forge another MP's signature on the attendance sheet, as each sheet will be checked by a verifier who will guarantee the legitimacy of the signatures. Disciplinary action may be taken if an MP falsifies his or her colleague's signature.

The issue of proving attendance in parliament has been topical since a scandal in May that involved MPs from the coalition Slovak National Party (SNS). According to the Sme daily, SNS caucus leader Rafael Rafaj forged several signatures of his party chief Ján Slota. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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