Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

AROUND SLOVAKIA

Paul Newman’s roots were in Humenné

PAUL Newman, the legendary American actor who died on September 26, was born in Shaker Heights, Ohio, but his mother – whose birth name was Terézia Fecková – was born in the Slovak town of Humenné. The actor’s grandmother is buried there and some of his relatives still live there, the Pravda daily wrote.

Paul Newman's relatives live in Humenné. (Source: SITA)

PAUL Newman, the legendary American actor who died on September 26, was born in Shaker Heights, Ohio, but his mother – whose birth name was Terézia Fecková – was born in the Slovak town of Humenné. The actor’s grandmother is buried there and some of his relatives still live there, the Pravda daily wrote.

“His Slovak relatives 'met' [Newman, through his films] in 1965 for the first time,” Slovak film historian Richard Blech said. “By then, Newman’s film Sweet Bird of Youth had been shown in Humenné.”
Newman never personally visited the town, but knew he had roots in this part of Europe. According to Blech, Newman mentioned his heritage to U.S. journalists who were surprised when he referred to Czecho-Slovak President Václav Havel as “Dear Václav” during his visit to the U.S. in the early 1990s.
Terézia Fecková followed her father to the U.S. at the turn of the 20th century, when she was still a small child. Her mother and grandmother had already died. Her father married in the U.S., as did she – twice. Her first marriage ended in divorce, but the second endured. Her second husband was a furrier named Newman, with whom she had two sons. The older one was named Arthur and the younger one was Paul.
Both sons served in the Pacific during the Second World War. When they returned home in 1946, their mother wrote excited letters to her family in Slovakia. She also sent a family photo, on which she wrote text in the eastern-Slovak dialect.

“She also sent home Paul’s army uniform,” Blech added. “Her sister then re-sewed it into a suit, but the unstitched emblem on the uniform’s sleeve remained preserved.”

Top stories

Gilden: Take the negative and make a positive from it Photo

The works of New York native, photographer Bruce Gilden, who has worked for five decades in the streets of the biggest cities, are on exhibit in the Kunsthalle (House of Arts) in Bratislava.

Bruce Gilden: Feast of San Gennero, Little Italy, 1984.

The ongoing struggle for a free and democratic Slovakia

The people of Slovakia deserve the credit for the remarkable progress that this country has made over the past twenty-five years, US ambassador writes.

Illustrative stock photo

Foreigners: Top 10 events in Bratislava Video

Tips for the top 10 events in the capital between November 24 and December 3, plus regular services in different languages, training, temporary exhibitions and highlights of the year.

Christmas Markets Bratislava

Robert Fico has lost the electoral magic he once had Plus

But his party can still bounce back if they do the things that make parties resilient.

Robert Fico claims that Smer won the regional elections because it is the party with the most chairs in regional councils.