Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Gašparovič sides with police on Dunajská Streda incident

President Ivan Gašparovič stated on November 3 that he supports the police intervention after last weekend’s football match between DAC Dunajská Streda and Slovan Bratislava, the TASR newswire wrote.

President Ivan Gašparovič stated on November 3 that he supports the police intervention after last weekend’s football match between DAC Dunajská Streda and Slovan Bratislava, the TASR newswire wrote.

He also said he was concerned about the politicisation of the incident, which targeted football hooligans.

"Extremism, intolerance and the eruption of nationalist passions do not belong in society, politics or sport," the president said, adding that tolerance of extremists based on their nationality motivates them to continue.

"This ministry enforces a zero tolerance on hooligans," Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák at the press conference.

He said that the police had to intervene early enough to ensure that the violence didn't escalate.

"The police intervened against fans from both sides. Therefore, we consider the statements by the [ethnic-Hungarian party] SMK and of the Hungarian government as politically motivated.”

But, speaking at its own press conference on November 3, SMK chairman Pál Csáky said he saw no reason for the intervention. He said the SMK plans to ensure that Kaliňák submits proof that the policemen were attacked in the sector of the arena where they were intervened.

Csáky said the police should have picked the perpetrators out from the crowd, and not beat up people who were lying on the floor unable to defend themselves. Csáky mentioned also alleged existing that one policemen used a metal pole, which is prohibited throughout the Europe.

Csáky encouraged those injured to file charges. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Governmental campaign should bring Slovaks home from the UK

The Slovak cabinet plans to persuade its expats living and working in the UK with at least a bachelor degree to return home: a campaign offering specific jobs should help.

Young researchers, IT experts and medical staffers are needed in Slovakia, illustrative stock photo.

EU lawyers claiming the Russian annexation of Crimea as legal is a hoax

One lawyer does not mean all EU lawyers; immigrants attacking a shepherd dog and HAARP causing hurricanes in the US are hoaxes, too.

Hoax on immigrants attackign two German shepdherds and ebing bitten yb them

Co-founder and co-owner of Sme daily dies

A major Slovak entrepreneur, Peter Vajda, died in Prague on October 15. He was exceptional for his innate sense of democracy and believing in equal opportunities for all.

Peter Vajda

Germans in Slovakia preserve their culture

The German minority is aging, and despite efforts, not many young descendants affiliate themselves with their origins.

Hauerlandfest is one of the bigger regional events.