Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovak Supreme Court overrules outlawing of extremist group Slovenská Pospolitosť

The Slovak Supreme Court annulled the Interior Ministry's decision of November 12, 2008 to outlaw the extreme right-wing organisation Slovenská Pospolitosť (SP)(Slovak Togetherness), returning the matter to the ministry, Peter Preti from the Supreme Court told the TASR newswire on Wednesday, July 1.

The Slovak Supreme Court annulled the Interior Ministry's decision of November 12, 2008 to outlaw the extreme right-wing organisation Slovenská Pospolitosť (SP)(Slovak Togetherness), returning the matter to the ministry, Peter Preti from the Supreme Court told the TASR newswire on Wednesday, July 1.

The Supreme Court ruled that Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák's decision was illegal and that the legal conditions for disbanding Slovenská Pospolitosť had not been met. The Interior Ministry decided to outlaw this organization in response to “activities that incite hatred and national, racial, religious as well as political intolerance, achieving its goals via actions that contradict the Slovak Constitution and law”.

Prime Minister Robert Fico reacted to the ministry's move in November 2008 by claiming that this was proof that Slovakia will noy tolerate the spreading of national or racial hatred. The Interior Ministry will outlaw the SP a second time as it hasn't put a stop to its unlawful activities, ministry spokesman Erik Tomáš said on the same day. The Slovak Supreme Court's ruling on Wednesday to annul the Interior Ministry's decision which outlawed Slovenská Pospolitosť is beyond my comprehension, said Slovak National Party (SNS) leader Ján Slota later in the day. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

How rock music helped bring down the totalitarian regime Video

A new film shows that Rock & Roll, forbidden in the Soviet Union, helped to end the Cold War.

Illustrative Stock Photo

Peter Sagan announces split with his wife Katarína

The Slovak cycling star who has a young son said “It will be much better this way”.

Peter Sagan marries Katarína, November 2015.

Heavy rains flood the Tatras Video

People had to be evacuated and several hiking routes had to be closed.

Stará Lesná

Trump plays with the world like a spoiled child

The White House is now broadcasting its most spectacular soap opera, beating and overcoming those of sundry leaders from different continents and different times.

Donald Trump