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Transparency International warns that people fear to report public corruption

Participants in a seminar organised by the non-governmental organisation Transparency International Slovensko (TIS) said that few people inSlovakia are willing to report incidents of public corruption because they are afraid it may turn against them, as there is no applicable protective legislation. For that reason TIS is recommending that the government adopt more specific measures. TIS head Emília Sičáková-Beblavá told the SITA newswire that this topic may be part of the election campaign next year.

Participants in a seminar organised by the non-governmental organisation Transparency International Slovensko (TIS) said that few people in
Slovakia are willing to report incidents of public corruption because they are afraid it may turn against them, as there is no applicable protective legislation. For that reason TIS is recommending that the government adopt more specific measures. TIS head Emília Sičáková-Beblavá told the SITA newswire that this topic may be part of the election campaign next year.

She said that there is fear in many organisations of the public sector. People are afraid that if they report such incidents they will be punished because those who speak out are not protected.

However, she cited a successful example of such efforts, the initiative of some of the employees of the biggest forestry company in Slovakia - Lesy SR. Employees, as members of the petition committee called People for Forests accused their own management of siphoning the company's assets in July. The police are investigating the case.

The latest survey by the Czech company "Surveilligence" and its partners also indicated that reporting foul practices is unusual in Slovakia. The company approached over 1,300 Slovak organisations, however, only 74 of them returned the survey. Company director Ján Lalka assumes that only those companies that have adopted some relevant measures reacted and filled out the questionnaire. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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