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Slovak tunnel experts dig in Finland

EXPERTS from Tunely SK, part of the Slovak arm of global construction firm Skanska, headquartered in Sweden, have joined a project to construct a railway line connecting the centre of the Finnish capital, Helsinki, with the city’s main airport at Vantaa. Slovak tunnel-building specialists will carry work worth €1 million and widen an 800-metre section of the tunnel for local company Skanska Infra OY, the SITA newswire reported on February 2.

EXPERTS from Tunely SK, part of the Slovak arm of global construction firm Skanska, headquartered in Sweden, have joined a project to construct a railway line connecting the centre of the Finnish capital, Helsinki, with the city’s main airport at Vantaa. Slovak tunnel-building specialists will carry work worth €1 million and widen an 800-metre section of the tunnel for local company Skanska Infra OY, the SITA newswire reported on February 2.

Forty workers from Tunely SK are currently working on the tunnel as part of the Ring Rail Line project.

“Expert knowledge, skills and the great experience of our workers in this field are required and professionally acclaimed at sister companies of Skanska,” Tunely SK director Peter Witkovský said, as quoted by SITA. “Apart from Finland, workers from our company have also been working for a third year on a project in Sweden, the construction of a bypass of Stockholm, as well as in Norway, where they are participating in the construction of an underground hydropower station.”

Skanska SK has been operating under this name since April 1, 2010, after a merger of six companies. The company now comprises eight units, covering all construction sectors.

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