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Extremists in Hungary protested against Trianon outside Slovak embassy

Several hundred extremists attended the traditional protest held in front of the Slovak Embassy to Hungary, as well as other foreign embassies in the country, to protest against the Treaty of Trianon, signed on June 4, 1920. The police blocked the embassy with metal barricades, the TASR newswire reported on June 2.

Several hundred extremists attended the traditional protest held in front of the Slovak Embassy to Hungary, as well as other foreign embassies in the country, to protest against the Treaty of Trianon, signed on June 4, 1920. The police blocked the embassy with metal barricades, the TASR newswire reported on June 2.

The protest was organised by the Youth Movement of 64 Counties (HVIM), as well as the sympathisers of the Jobbik party and other ultra-right organisations. Several tens of protesters were wearing uniforms similar to those belonging to the outlawed Hungarian Guard.

According to Jobbik MP Tamás Gaudi-Nagy, a revision to the peace dictate passed 93 years ago is necessary. He added that the Treaty of Trianon can be perceived as an attempt to kill the nation, which was accompanied by the trampling of the rights of the Hungarian nation to self-determination, TASR wrote.

The protest, which was held in front of the Slovak, Serbian and Romanian embassies, was supervised by police.

The protest ended without any major incidents, TASR reported.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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