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Slovak behind fatal accident in Hungary stands trial

The daughter of late Slovak businessman and Mečiar-era minister Alexander Rezeš, Eva Varholíková-Rezešová, appeared in court one year after her involvement in a fatal car accident which claimed the lives of four people. If convicted, she faces 5 to 12 years in prison for causing the accident and for drunk-driving, the SITA newswire wrote.

The daughter of late Slovak businessman and Mečiar-era minister Alexander Rezeš, Eva Varholíková-Rezešová, appeared in court one year after her involvement in a fatal car accident which claimed the lives of four people. If convicted, she faces 5 to 12 years in prison for causing the accident and for drunk-driving, the SITA newswire wrote.

The Hospodárske Noviny daily, as well as other Slovak media, reported on August 28 that Varholíková-Rezešová (36) denies any guilt in causing the accident. The trial has begun, but although she has been heard by the court, she did not actually testify. The Nový Čas tabloid wrote that five witnesses are testifying against her, while two truck drivers who were at the scene of the accident testified on her behalf.

After the fatal car accident on Hungary's M3 highway on August 21, 2012, Varholíková-Rezešová was taken to custody in Hungary. A BMW car driven by her reportedly collided with a Fiat Punto. The Fiat then hit the crash barriers on the highway and caught fire, resulting in the deaths of all four passengers. Varholíková-Rezešová suffered only minor injuries. According to the police, she was intoxicated at the time of the accident and she might have even tried to push Fiat Punto off the highway.

The experts found that she had 1.5 per mil of alcohol in her blood after the accident, and a bottle containing vodka was found in her car. Moreover, she was driving 165-175 kilometres per hour in a 130 zone, SITA reported, quoting a forensics expert.

(Source: SITA, Hospodárske Noviny, Nový čas)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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