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Photographer Tibor Huszár dies

Famous Slovak photographer Tibor Huszár died on September 11 at his home in Modra, just outside the capital, at the age of 61.

Famous Slovak photographer Tibor Huszár died on September 11 at his home in Modra, just outside the capital, at the age of 61.

Huszár graduated from the photography programme at the Prague Film and Television Faculty of the Film Academy in 1983, and worked for various magazines and media. In his photos he also documented the theatre world, the SITA newswire wrote. Starting in the 1990s, he left for New York where he worked as an independent lecturer and photographer.

He later returned to Slovakia to lecture at the Art Academy in Banská Bystrica and most recently, he led the photography studio of undergraduates of the Faculty of Mass Media Communication at the University of SS Cyril and Methodius in Trnava. He exhibited in many venues and published books of photographs, such as Cigáni (Gypsies), Portréty (Portrayals), Koloman Sokol, Návrat späť (Returning), New York, Indiáni (Red Indians), Réte Reca and others.

He spent more than 15 years photographing Roma, the TASR newswire wrote, and his Cigáni series became quite famous. Huszár received many awards, both Slovak and foreign, including the Golden Plaque from the International Triennial of Theatre Photography, Yugoslavia 1983 and the Trebbia award for supporting art, creativity and contribution to dialogue, in Prague, 2011.

(Source: SITA, TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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