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Mayors threaten to strike over taxes

MUNICIPAL governments are threatening to go on strike unless the central government allocates more money to towns and villages from next year’s budget. The Slovak Association of Towns and Villages (ZMOS) is demanding the government to increase its share of the national personal income tax from 65.4 percent to 70.3 percent, the Sme daily reported.

MUNICIPAL governments are threatening to go on strike unless the central government allocates more money to towns and villages from next year’s budget. The Slovak Association of Towns and Villages (ZMOS) is demanding the government to increase its share of the national personal income tax from 65.4 percent to 70.3 percent, the Sme daily reported.

ZMOS is threatening with a strike alert if their demand is not met by the end of October, and says that self-governments are the only subjects of the public administration that save money.

In response to ZMOS’ statements, Finance Minister Peter Kažimír said he was willing to discuss the issue with representatives of towns and villages.

Local governments are demanding almost €100 million more than what has been allocated to them in cabinet-approved budget.

The debate grew fiercer after the government agreed with labour unions on a pay hike in the public sector and wanted municipalities to pay for it.

For mayors of Slovak towns and villages, 2014 is also the year of municipal elections.

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