Paška and Lykketoft warn against rise in radicalism

DEVELOPMENTS concerning standard political systems in Europe and the rise of populism and radicalism among new political entities were among the issues discussed by Slovak Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška and his Danish counterpart Mogens Lykketoft during his official visit to Slovakia on October 28.

DEVELOPMENTS concerning standard political systems in Europe and the rise of populism and radicalism among new political entities were among the issues discussed by Slovak Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška and his Danish counterpart Mogens Lykketoft during his official visit to Slovakia on October 28.

“The view of these parties on national and European issues is ever more radical,” Paška said, as quoted by the TASR newswire, referring to recent elections in the Czech Republic, Austria and Germany.

Paška and Lykketoft also discussed ways to persuade voters about the meaningfulness and legitimacy of the European Union project, the SITA newswire wrote.

Another issue was economic cooperation. Several Danish companies are prepared to invest in Slovakia, Paška said. Lykketoft added that the structure of Danish industry is varied and wide, and that at the moment Danes are active in the sector of furniture production, wind-generated electricity, and especially agriculture. Yet, the country would like to set up companies in other fields, like electricity production and the environment, SITA wrote.

“Denmark possesses interesting skills in this sphere that it would like to export to Slovakia,” Lykketoft said, as quoted by SITA.

The politician also said that Slovakia and Denmark have the same view on dealing with challenges which the EU has to face, like creating space for the growth and creation of new jobs and strengthening the role of the national parliament, according to SITA.

Lykketoft also met with Slovak Foreign Affairs Minister Miroslav Lajčák, with whom he discussed Denmark’s experience presiding over the Council of the European Union during the first half of 2012, and Slovakia’s prospects and preparation for its own presidency, which will take place in the second half of 2016, TASR wrote.

Lajčák also expressed Slovakia’s support for Lykketoft, who was nominated to the post of chairman of the 70th UN General Assembly session.

The politicians also discussed current foreign policy issues, like the Eastern Partnership and the upcoming summit, TASR reported.

Source: SITA, TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

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