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Strike will close schools

THOUSANDS of teachers will join a strike initiated by the Initiative of Slovak Teachers (ISU), which will start with a demonstration planned for January 25 in Bratislava.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

ISU representatives confirmed they will go on an across-the-board strike after a meeting of teachers’ representatives and Education Minister Juraj Draxler failed to resolve the long running dispute on January 21.

“Though I would like to satisfy [their requirements], it is not possible technically,” Draxler said, as quoted by the Sme daily. “It is not possible to summon the parliament and change the budget.”

Draxler earlier suggested the teachers’ protests were politicised and manipulated.

The ministry on January 19 sent its calculation to the media that the average teacher makes €997 per month, and more than the average salary in most of Slovakia’s regions.

The January 25 demonstration will start on SNP Square in Bratislava at 11:00. To increase the participation of teachers outside of Bratislava,the organisers plan to secure mass transport by trains.

When The Slovak Spectator went to print on January 21, more than 10,000 teachers from nearly 600 kindergartens, primary and secondary schools had pledged to join the planned strike.

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Topic: Education


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