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Slovak cities suffer from smog

The higher concentration of dust particulates is caused by cold and windless weather.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SITA/AP)

Several cities across Slovakia are having problems with a high concentration of polluting dust particulates, PM10.

The Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute (SHMÚ) has issued a warning for seven areas: Žilina, Nitra, Košice, Veľká Ida (Košice Region), Topoľníky (Trnava Region), Trenčín and Ružomberok (Žilina Region), the TASR newswire reported.

The bad situation is caused by cold and windless weather with stable stratification of the atmosphere prevailing at ground level, according to SHMÚ.

The increased concentration of dust particulates may particularly affect old people, people suffering from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, people with allergies, small children and pregnant women. Sensitive people may feel irritation of the eyes, nose and throat, chest tightness, cough, and headache.

Chronic effects may be expected especially if the body is repeatedly exposed to an increased concentration of PM10 particulates for a long period. This may become evident from diseases of the airways and lungs, as well as worsening immunity.

SHMÚ recommends that more sensitive people should limit time outside, shorten the ventilation time of residential spaces and limit physical activity and outdoor sport, TASR reported.

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