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NGOs sue state for poor air protection

Around 170,000 people live in air-polluted parts of Bratislava.

(Source: AP)

The programme for air quality improvement, created by Bratislava’s District Office, is vague and contains no specific goals despite legislative demands, according to some environmental non-government organizations.

The Centre for Sustainable Alternatives (CEPTA), ClientEarth, the Cycling Coalition together with ten individuals are therefore suing the state over poor air protection in the Slovak Capital.

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“Air pollution is a serious health and environmental problem,” Igor Trenk of the Cycling Coalition told the press. “Many institutions pretend that they are dealing with this problem but instead of real solutions they produce worthless stacks of paper.”

Around 170,000 people live in air-polluted parts of Bratislava and others travel there for work, acording to the NGOs.

If the court finds for the NGOs, Bratislava’s District Office will have to improve the programme.

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