Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Adient will shut down its Lozorno plant in 2018

The current employees have been offered jobs at other centres in Slovakia.

Adient is a global leader in the production of automobile seats.(Source: TASR)

The company Adient, a global leader in the production of automobile seats, has announced that it will close its factory in Lozorno (Bratislava Region) by the end of June 2018. The reason is a decision by an existing client not to extend a business contract, the TASR newswire reported.

The company management analysed several options at both regional and global levels concerning how to provide new opportunities for the Lozorno factory, but the analysis has produced no effective solutions.

Aware of the consequences that the closure of its factory will have on the local labour force, the management has offered its employees jobs at other centres in Slovakia based on their qualifications. Under the terms of the collective agreement, the 250 employees affected will receive severance pay and further support.

“Making this decision wasn’t easy,” said Hynek Maňas, European director of the manufacturing complete seat system division, as quoted by TASR. “All projects dealing with the manufacture of complete seat systems in Lozorno will terminate after approximately 11 months and, therefore, this move was inevitable.”

Adient runs another five production factories in Slovakia, a technological centre in Trenčín and a global business centre in Bratislava.

“Shutting down production in Lozorno won’t have any impact on the operation of the other centres,” Maňas said, as quoted by TASR. “Slovakia will continue to provide key processes, with our other centres in Slovakia currently having more than 280 new jobs up for grabs.”

Adient currently employs 75,000 people at 230 production facilities in 33 countries.

Topic: Automotive


Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.