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Slovakia wants to intensify links with Japan

Slovak foreign affairs minister was invited to Tokyo in early July on the occasion of his election as the president of the 72nd UN Assembly.

Slovak Foreign Affairs Minister Miroslav Lajčák.(Source: SITA)

In a more globalised world and complicated security situation it is necessary to coordinate international efforts to solve problems effectively, particularly at the UN. In this respect, Japan is an active member of the international community and it is necessary to continue in developing mutual cooperation, Slovak Foreign Affairs Minister Miroslav Lajčák agreed with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Lajčák was invited to Tokyo in early July on the occasion of his election as the president of the 72nd UN Assembly.

“The world needs a platform that is solid, effective and ready to solve problems of the 21st century,” Lajčák said, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “The UN creates such a platform, but it is necessary to strengthen, reform and revitalise it in order to move forward. We need the UN more than anytime before.”

The Slovak foreign affairs minister also appreciated Japan’s efforts to secure peace in the world.

The threat posed by North Korea’s nuclear and ballistics programme was also among the discussed topics.

“We have to exert pressure on Pyongyang to stop ballistics tests that only escalate tension in the region and insist on the country to observe the respective UN Security Council’s resolutions,” Lajčák said, as quoted by TASR. “It’s not possible that a country with clear international commitments decides not to respect them.”

Lajčák also met with his Japanese counterpart Fumio Kishida, with whom he discussed the possibilities to extend the cooperation within the UN and ways to increase its quality. The Slovak foreign affairs minister presented his priorities as UN Assembly president, focusing on maintaining peace and preventing conflicts. They also talked about potential cooperation when preparing the so-called migration compact at the UN, and support when working on the UN’s budget for years 2018-2019.

As for the bilateral collaboration, Lajčák appreciated the political dialogue at top levels, and successful economic cooperation.

“We will celebrate the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between our countries next year,” Lajčák said, as quoted by TASR, adding the period was typical of the intensive cooperation in which they want to continue.

Japanese companies are perceived in Slovakia as serious and trustworthy partners, and Slovakia is ready to support and help to broaden the Japanese investments in the country, Lajčák said.

In the eyes of Slovakia, Japan is interesting as a source of direct foreign investments but also for its top research and innovative potential, TASR wrote.

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