Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Invalids abused and forced to beg

The human traffickers responsible may spend up to 12 years in prison.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: Sme)

The police have brought charges against six people who, since 2013, are suspected of transporting at least 16 people from socially disadvantaged environments abroad and forcing them to beg there.

The police investigator accused Július K., Renáta K., Patrik K., Karol K. and Václav O., and another unidentified person in absentia of the particularly serious crime of human trafficking, the TASR newswire reported.

“The accused are facing seven to twelve years in prison,” said Police Corps Vice President Ľubomír Ábel, as quoted by TASR.

At least 16 people, including invalids, are said to have been forced to beg in Salzburg Austria, Olten Switzerland, and Berlin Germany.

“In most cases they were also beaten,” Ábel said, as quoted by TASR.

Each victim managed to make €100-300 daily by begging, which they had to surrender to the accused, leaving themselves with only minimal sums for food, according to the police.

The police took measures against the accused on January 5 in the Rimavská Sobota district. They carried out four house searches during which they seized several documents and papers. The total damage amounts to hundreds of thousands of euros, according to the police.

They are also checking whether any of the trafficked people died, TASR reported.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Czech PM files lawsuit against Slovakia at ECHR

Czech Premier Andrej Babiš sues his homeland in the European Court for Human Rights in connection with records proving his collaboration with the communist-era secret police.

Andrej Babiš

Revitalised industrial building offers work, entertainment and housing

Mlynica is an excellent example of successful conversion of unused industrial building.

Mlynica

Youngest Slovak village is a "communist dream come true” Photo

Dedina Mládeže (The Youth Village) was a mere experiment during the communist era. Now, the still inhabited village has morphed into an open-air museum.

Dedina Mládeže

What are the reasons behind low wages in Slovakia?

The average wage costs per Slovak employee accounts for only 44 percent of the EU average.