Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Bratislava airport has competition in Vienna

The airport in Vienna, only about 60 kilometres from the Slovak capital, gains 17 new low-cost airliner flights.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: TASR)

M.R. Štefánik airport in Bratislava (BTS) will gain a new competitor this year: The Hungarian low-cost airliner Wizz Air will open 17 new lines from Schwechat airport in Vienna to various destinations within Europe, the Sme daily wrote on January 16.

BTS has not commented on this step, rather focusing on developing the network of air connections on the Slovak market with Wizz Air.

The Hungarian airline currently flies from Bratislava to four destinations; and from March, a fifth one, to London, will be opened. It also flies from two other Slovak airports – Poprad and Košice.

Wizz Air plans to add the new routes from Vienna gradually, from Gdansk in Polish and Tuzla in Bosnia-Herzegovina by end of April, through summer flights to Valencia, Spain, Rome and Tel Aviv, to Bergen in Norway by the end of this year. Nevertheless, they could negatively impact the numbers of passengers in nearby Bratislava.

What do the new routes mean for Bratislava?

“This step may mean a regulated decline in travelling passengers, since they will use the new lines from Vienna,” Martin Miklánek of the Gander Group consultation company evaluated for Sme. He added that some air companies may consider whether they will compete against one another on the same air routes. This situation is a huge challenge for M.R. Štefánik airport, which should prepare for a possible decrease in passengers and offer new air routes that would not compete with Vienna and have a sufficient occupancy rate, Miklánek summed up for Sme.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Topic: Airlines


Top stories

From refugee to top production designer in Canada and Hollywood

They allowed us to poke out our heads, to chop them off later, the late Val Strazovec said.

Val Strazovec

The emigrant who became a world-famous pantomimist Photo

Milan Sládek appreciates the attempts to make Slovakia a “healthier” country.

Pictures from The Gift pantomime show. Sladek wrote it in the Swedish town of Goteborg in 1969 as a metaphor for Czechoslovakia's cohabitation with the Soviet Union. It was first staged in 1971 in Cologne and then in 50 countries around the world.

Blog: The economy’s need of Shared Service Centers

Shared Service Centers - soon the second biggest employer in Slovakia with over 60 thousand people - how did it get there and where is it heading?

Business service centres are expanding outside the capital as well.

Designer who printed anti-occupation posters found home in Sweden

Two Russian cars stuffed with cabbages prompted Dušan Daučík and his wife Mária to leave occupied Czechoslovakia.

An older picture of Dušan Daučík and his, now late, wife Mária.