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Do you want to remove the graffiti from your wall? Ask for a grant

Bratislava city council is again offering Bratislavans money to remove graffiti for themselves.

Graffiti blemish many public spaces of Bratislava.(Source: Courtesy of Bratislava city council)

Bratislava city council is again offering the city’s residents money to remove illegal graffiti. This year it has allocated €150,000 for the purpose.

“Cleanliness and maintenance of public spaces is one of the priorities of the capital, continuing in 2018,” said Bratislava Mayor, Ivo Nesrovnal. “We want cleaner and nicer public spaces.”

The experience of the city council is that Bratislavans are increasingly coming to care for their city as their interest in the money allocated for the removal of graffiti is growing each year.

Legal entities not launched by the city and private individuals with permanent residence in Bratislava are entitled to receive such grants. They can apply for a contribution of up to €3,000. It must be used to cover the costs linked with the removal of illegal graffiti from the facades of housing and non-housing buildings. This includes the purchase of agents used to remove the graffiti, preventive anti-graffiti paints and related services, the city council informs in its press release.

Read also:Bratislava is cleaning graffiti off bridges and other public places

Last year, 93 entities applied for these grants and the whole of the €150,000 set aside for this purpose was used up.

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Topic: Bratislava


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