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The “inverted pyramid” becomes a national cultural monument. Have you seen it yet?

The building is unique with its architectural style and belongs among the symbols of Slovakia’s capital.

The radio pyramid during White Night in 2017. (Source: Sme - Jozef Jakubčo)
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The Monuments Board announced that the building of Slovak Radio in Bratislava is a national cultural monument. The building is known among people as the “inverted pyramid”.

“It represents the architectural heritage of post-war modern architecture and is one of the most significant works of the late modernism in Slovakia at its most expressive experimental form,” the Monuments Board said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

The building, designed by Slovak architects Štefan Ďurkovič and Štefan Svetko, exceeds national importance with its qualities.

“As an important piece of central European modern art the Slovak Radio building was published in renowned foreign publishing houses and magazines,” the board claimed, as quoted by TASR, adding that the crucial recording rooms and the concert hall in their original architectural style are unique in Slovakia.

The building is still considered one of the late-modern art symbols of Bratislava. In 2001 it won the Construction of the Century poll, in the category of Civil Buildings.

“Thanks to easy transparency in the city’s panorama this extraordinarily strong architectural singularity belongs among the key elements of urbanism,” the Monuments Board added, as quoted by TASR.

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Topic: Tourism and travel in Slovakia


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