Slovaks will work fewer days to pay off their taxes this year

The tax agenda keeps increasing.

(Source: Sme)

Calculations of the audit and consultancy company Deloitte show that taxpayers in Slovakia will have to work less days this year to pay off their taxes to the state treasury. The Tax Freedom Day will fall on May 30 meaning that taxpayers will work 151 days to settle their tax duties, which is seven days less than last year, the SITA newswire reported.

Despite the fact that the Tax Freedom Day is closer to the beginning of the year, according to Deloitte partner and tax adviser Ľubica Dumitrescu, taxpayers in Slovakia still feel there are some problematic areas in the tax system.

“Slovak taxpayers have been experiencing an increase in the tax agenda for a while now,” said Dumitrescu, adding that this is also related to a change in the approach of the Financial Administration and its greater focus on analysing individual data from tax returns.

Among European countries that are under comparison, Romania is doing the best as its Tax Freedom Day this year falls on May 3, and local taxpayers will have to work 124 days for their government, followed by Bulgaria with 126 days and Switzerland with 127 days.

On the other hand, taxpayers in Luxembourg have to work the longest - 271 days. France is a distant second with 208 days and Belgium comes in third with 206 days. Taxpayers in the UK and Spain are in a similar situation to those in Slovakia.

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