Slovak students win international physics competition

The young women shone among attendees from 15 different countries.

(Source: IPPOG)

Slovak students from the Ľudovít Štúr School in Zvolen, Andrea Škvareninová and Radka Veselá, won the international physics competition Particles4U by constructing a Paul ion trap using only easily accessible and low cost tools. They were able to demonstrate catching ions in a trap with the help of green laser light. Ion traps use dynamic electric fields to trap charged particles.

The competition, which was attended by participants from 15 countries, was organized by the International Particle Physics Outreach Group with support from the European Physical Society. The aim of competitors, who were divided into two categories over or under 12 years old, was to create educational, funny and inspiring tools that demonstrate the presence of elementary particles in everyday life.

Read also:Slovak astrophysicists return from Olympiad in Thailand with medals

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Deputy parliamentary speaker sent selfies to Alena Zs.

Yet another influential Smer politician, Martin Glváč, faces accusations of talking to Kočner's collaborator.

Igor Matovič of OĽaNO holds a picture of Martin Glváč (Smer).

Coalition demands the right of reply for politicians

Politicians ponder new provisions for the Press Code, Speaker of Parliament Danko wants to defend himself against op-eds too.

The ruling coalition (L-R: SNS-Andrej Danko, Smer-Robert Fico. Most-Híd-Béla Bugár).

Slovakia’s Pohoda wins two prestigious European festival awards

The festival organiser praised the awards and says they want to continue and improve the quality of the summer festival.

"They united us." - tribute to Ján Kuciak and Martina Kušnírová at Pohoda 2018.

Maya expert: The world we live in is not the only one possible

Leading Slovak expert contributes to rewriting Maya history.

Milan Kováč