Last Week in Slovakia: Murder of journalist and his fiancée shook the whole country

The murdered journalist Ján Kuciak investigated links between politicians and Italian mafia.

These top three stories from Slovakia are a selection of headlines from a weekly overview in pdf and audio format that subscribers of The Slovak Spectator receive directly in their inboxes every Thursday morning.

Investigative reporter Jan Kuciak and his fiancee Martina Kusnirova were found murdered in their house in Velka Maca on Sunday night. The police believe their murder to be linked with Kuciak's work. The last story the journalist worked on pointed to links between people close to the government and the Italian organised crime group 'Ndrangheta.

Read more about Kuciak's work in an interview with reporter of the Sme daily Adam Valček who initially cooperated with Kuciak on the case of Italian Mafia.

Slovakia is standing at a crossroads and much will depend on whether Robert Fico realises that this is a crucial point and how much he wants to stay in power, says Beata Balogová, editor-in-chief of Slovakia’s leading daily Sme and member of the IPI Executive Board.

After two days it is not possible to say how events will turn out from here, but there will be consequences: democracy and freedom in this country will either grow stronger, or will decline, writes Michaela Terenzani.

Below you can listen to all the headlines from Last Week in Slovakia published on February 28.

Top stories

News digest: Fear and anger are prevaling emotions in Slovakia, president said

Kočner and Zsuzsová charged with planning murders. PCR tests are free for symptomatic people.


7 h
President Zuzana Caputova delivers her state of the republic address in parliament on September 27, 2021.

President Čaputová: We need to protect this world and Slovakia's place in it

In her speech about the state of the republic, the president offered a grim summary of the pandemic so far. Slovakia is in desperate need of stability.


12 h
Ahmedur Rashid Chowdhury (aka Tutul)

Bratislava reminds me of Bangladesh, says exiled writer

Ahmedur Rashid Chowdhury calls on the Slovak capital to help exiled writers and artists work through their trauma.


17 h
Most Slovak believe that “we” should also include foreigners, although they are quick to point out that efforts to integrate should be undertaken mainly by the foreigners themselves.

What Slovaks shouldn’t forget when they dream of the perfect foreigner

Bratislava’s mayor is right that integration is a two-way street, but even the capital still has some way to go to see foreigners as residents rather than just visitors.


27. sep
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