It is no news journalists in Central Europe face hostility

The consistency and accumulation of the incidents when politicians verbally attack journalists shows a clear trend in Central Europe, and slowly makes it acceptable to make ever more serious threats, or worse.

Milos ZemanMilos Zeman (Source: MAFRA - LADISLAV NĚMEC)

In the wake of the tragic murders of Ján Kuciak and Martina Kušnírová, it is impossible to ignore the increasingly hostile atmosphere for journalists in Central Europe — Slovakia included.

Viktor Orbán’s government regularly targets journalists, by alleging they are colluding with financier George Soros in an attempt to bring him down.

“We must stand our ground against the Soros mafia network and bureaucrats in Brussels, and will have to go to battle against the media they operate in the coming months,” he said in July 2017. A few months later, the pro-government news site 888.hu published a list of international journalists it said were out to damage Hungary’s standing in the world, and accused them of colluding with the financier George Soros. One wonders what a list like that is designed to do?

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

Top stories

Sky by Monika and Bohuš Kubinský

Bratislava is ready for White Night. Here's all you need to know

A manual for the festival and seven sites selected by The Slovak Spectator.


18 h

News digest: Number of cases double in a week, state of emergency not ruled out

Meteorologists issued warnings against intense rainfall for the southern and western districts of Slovakia. There will be regular flights from two Russian cities to Bratislava.


18 h

Connecting families with neurodiverse or differently-abled children

Parents and children from Bratislava, Vienna and surroundings are invited.


16. sep
Iranian comedian Nastaran "Nasi" Alaghmandan Motlagh is one of the faces of the fjúžn festival, which will kick off in Bratislava on September 16, 2021.

Iranian comedian: I tried to be Slovak. It was a move in the wrong direction

In addition to reciting Sohrab Sepehri, stand-up comedian Nastaran "Nasi" Alaghmandan Motlagh speaks about the fjúžn festival and the period in her life when her family left Iran and moved to Slovakia.


14. sep
Skryť Close ad