Reconstruction of Bratislava Castle enters final phase

The castle and its surroundings are getting the Baroque look they had during the rule of Empress Maria Theresa.

Visualisation of the reconstructed Bratislava Castle(Source: www.bratislava-hrad.sk)
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The extensive reconstruction of Bratislava Castle is entering the third and final phase. It will consist of the reconstruction of eight buildings in the area of the castle. These include the Sigismund Gate, the lower eastern terrace, the Leopold courtyard, the former stables and the northern fortification walls. The reconstruction of the castle started in 2008 and the aim is to return the castle to the Baroque look it had during the rule of Empress Maria Theresa.

“Afterwards the castle will be an oasis of peace,” said Daniel Guspan, the head of the Slovak Parliament’s Office.

It is the Slovak Parliament, as the owner of this historical monument, which orchestrates the reconstruction. Now it is going to promulgate a public procurement for the third reconstruction phase. It estimates the costs at almost €14 million and they should last two years. It is hoped that reconstruction work may start within six months.

The Slovak Parliament promises a transparent procurement. So far most of the work on the castle has been carried out by the controversial company of Váhostav-SK.

After completion, the buildings will again serve the Slovak Parliament and the public. The premises will be also be better adapted for physically challenged people.

The complete castle reconstruction project includes the reconstruction of the castle building, the construction of copies of the winter riding hall, the orangery and the Baroque garden as well as the construction of the controversial garages below the castle and others. The price tag was projected to be about €126 million.

Read also:Controversial castle garage opened to public

Reconstruction and building works were preceded by archaeological excavations. These resulted in several exceptional findings like golden Celtic coins as well as the remains of Celtic architecture built according to Roman designs.

“This significant finding has exceeded all expectations and fundamentally changed our view, not only of the history of Bratislava and south-western Slovakia, but also of the development of the central European area during the first century BC,” said archaeologist Margaréta Musilová back in February 2015, as cited by the TASR newswire.

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Theme: Bratislava


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