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Switch to daylight-saving time will “delay” six trains

Slovakia will resume daylight saving time during the night from Saturday to Sunday.

(Source: AP/TASR)

The weekend time change will affect six trains in Slovakia. Daylight savings time will begin on Sunday, March 25 at 02:00, when the time will skip one hour forward to 03:00. Thus these trains will arrive in their final destinations one hour “later”. The time change will affect the express trains Zemplín, EuroNight and Metropol in both directions, the railway company ZSSK informed.

Daylight savings time was used in the Czechoslovak Republic between 1916 and 1918 and again between 1940 and 1949. After an almost 30-year break, daylight savings time was reintroduced in 1979.

The reason for this is to save energy and make better use of natural daylight. However, some claim that it does not make any real difference in terms of savings and that it disrupts people's bio-rhythms, making them more susceptible to illness.

Members of the European Parliament are calling for a thorough assessment of the current bi-annual time change. A resolution approved on February 8 said the EU should maintain a unified time regime even after any end to daylight-saving time. The bloc began to regulate the time regime in the 1980s by harmonising national practices. However, the opinions of MEPs, including Slovak ones, on this matter, are split.

Read also:Slovak MEPs have mixed opinions on annual clock change

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