Non-Bratislavans earn more than the natives

Young people can have a big chance of becoming rich in Slovakia, regardless of their parents' status.

People coming from Humenné or Prievidza who work in the capital may earn19 percent more than native Bratislavans.

This stems from an analysis published by the Institute of Financial Policy (IFP), run under the Finance Ministry.

While native Bratislavans earn €1,235 a month on average, people coming from outside the capital get around €235 more, i.e. €1,471 a month on average.

Motivation plays an important role

The IFP analysis suggests that more productive people are more willing to commute or relocate for work.

“The higher salary motivates people from other Slovak regions to come to Bratislava,” said Tomáš Rizman, the author of the analysis, as quoted by the Sme daily. “Conversely, more productive native Bratislavans seek higher salaries abroad in particular.”

Motivation also plays an important role. If somebody decides to leave their region and break social bonds, it is logical that they expect higher salaries. This is why they come with this demand to the job interview, according to Michal Páleník, head of the Employment Institute.

Moreover, these people are more active, more assertive and more ambitious.

Páleník says that the statistics include people who change their permanent residence to Bratislava.

“People usually do so when they are secure, which means they have higher income,” Páleník told Sme.

University education plays a role, too

Another factor is that people who studied in Bratislava usually stay in the city, said INEKO think tank head Peter Goliaš.

This might be proven by the difference in salaries, even more distinctive in the case of people with university education.

“University educated employees coming from more eastern regions earn up to €2,077 in Bratislava, which is 24 percent more than the university graduates born in Bratislava,” Rizman said, as quoted by Sme.

The difference in salaries is also distinctive in the Košice Region, where the gap between locals and people coming from other regions is as high as 20 percent. In other regions, the differences are not as big. The smallest gap is in the Banská Bystrica Region.

Same chance to become rich

The IFP analysis suggests that most Slovak children have the same chance to become rich, regardless of their parents' salaries.

“An average Slovak has similar possibilities to receive higher income like Danes, Norwegians or Finns,” Rizman claimed, as quoted by Sme.

The situation is even fairer if a child or its parent graduated from university. However, the rule does not apply to children born into very poor families. Up to 60 percent of them have income lower than the minimum wage, the analysis shows.

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