Slovakia to mark the centenary of its independence with one-off state holiday

The business sector opposes another state holiday; it would rather see a reduction of state and public holidays in Slovakia

(Source: TASR)

Slovakia will celebrate the centenary of its independence with a one-off state holiday on October 30. It was Prime Minister Peter Pellegrini (Smer) who arrived with this proposal and the government has approved it. It still needs to be passed by parliament to be effective.

Representatives of the business sector are against having another state holiday, even a one-off, and calls this a non-systemic measure.

The tripartite, i.e. representative of employers, trade unions and the government failed to agree on the state holiday for October 30 at their session on Monday, May 21. The employers fear that there would be more one-off state holidays in the future and warned that Slovakia already has too many state and public holidays - as much as 15 days a year.

Nevertheless, Pellegrini stated on May 23 two days later that with all due respect for businesses, for him the centenary of the declaration “comes before the economic interests of Slovak business”.

On October 30, 1918, in Martin, more than 200 Slovak national and political decision-makers from around Slovakia adopted the Declaration of the Slovak Nation. The document effectively declared Slovakia’s independence from the Kingdom of Hungary and paved the way for Slovakia to unite with the Czech lands to create Czechoslovakia.

Top stories

News digest: Fear and anger are prevaling emotions in Slovakia, president said

Kočner and Zsuzsová charged with planning murders. PCR tests are free for symptomatic people.


8 h
President Zuzana Caputova delivers her state of the republic address in parliament on September 27, 2021.

President Čaputová: We need to protect this world and Slovakia's place in it

In her speech about the state of the republic, the president offered a grim summary of the pandemic so far. Slovakia is in desperate need of stability.


14 h
Ahmedur Rashid Chowdhury (aka Tutul)

Bratislava reminds me of Bangladesh, says exiled writer

Ahmedur Rashid Chowdhury calls on the Slovak capital to help exiled writers and artists work through their trauma.


19 h
Most Slovak believe that “we” should also include foreigners, although they are quick to point out that efforts to integrate should be undertaken mainly by the foreigners themselves.

What Slovaks shouldn’t forget when they dream of the perfect foreigner

Bratislava’s mayor is right that integration is a two-way street, but even the capital still has some way to go to see foreigners as residents rather than just visitors.


27. sep
Skryť Close ad