Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

6 percent of Slovaks lived in another EU country

According to a recent Eurostat data release, the number of EU citizens at a productive age living in another member state has been growing.

(Source: Sme)

The data of the European Union statistics office, Eurostat, published May 28, have found that about 3.8 percent of EU citizens at a productive age lived in a different member state than their homeland last year, up from 2.5 percent recorded 10 years ago.

Regarding Slovakia, the share of its nationals living in a different state of the Union amounted to 6 percent, up from 3.6 percent 10 years ago and from 4.3 in 2012, the Denník N quoted Eurostat.

The situation is different in individual member countries: while Germany recorded only 1 percent of its citizens at a productive age (i.e. between 20 and 64 years of age) living in another EU country, in Romania it was nearly 20 percent. People with university education are more mobile than the rest of the population, according to Eurostat.

The employment rate of mobile EU citizens is also higher than that of the entire population: 76.1 percent, compared with the total EU employment rate of 72.1 percent, Eurostat informed.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Topic: European Union


Top stories

Slovaks who fled the 1968 occupation tell their stories

How would it feel to pack my suitcases tonight and leave all this tomorrow morning, never to return?

Last days in Austria before departure from the US. Valika Tóthová and her family (parents Pavol and Hedviga Solar, sisters Alica and Darinka, and son Petrík)
Autorkou fotky je .

Prominent architect felt he needed to prove himself abroad

Slovakia today grapples with the same problems as Germany and Austria, opines Peter Gero.

Peter Gero and wife in Germany.

Tanks have stripped the regime naked

Communist leaders cared little about the ideology. They only wanted power.

Tanks in Bratislava

Tanks rumbled through the streets, crushing everything in their way

Tim Wade visited Czechoslovakia in 1968 as a 12-year-old boy. Here are his memories from the invasion in Prague.

My family with our Czech friends in Jihlava.