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Slovakia scored worse in health care than Pakistan

Even Pakistan scored better in health care, according to a recently published Index.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: Sme)

Slovaks are often complaining on the quality of Slovak health care and a look at the world metropolises confirms that the sector is below the average, the Hospodárske Noviny daily wrote on July 17.

The recently issued Health Care Index, compiled by the Numbeo website, ranks Bratislava 132nd out of the 199 surveyed cities – since it compares individual cities rather than countries. The ranking is based on the responses of people living in the given area. They were later filtered to avoid spams or mass fulfilment by one person.

The result is an index measuring the quality of the healthcare system, which includes the setting of the whole system, the professionalism of doctors, prices, equipment, responsiveness (i.e. waiting times, e.g.), the attitude of medical staff and other parameters. The highest score is 100.

Who is better off than Bratislava?

The best health care, according to the Numbeo ranking, is in Chiang Mai in Thailand (85.45 points), while the worst is in Baku, Azerbaijan (37.45). Bratislava received 64.74 points in total; but the results in individual categories are quite diverse. The best evaluation – 73.17, was in the category “Satisfaction with Cost to You”, followed by “Convenience of Location for You” at 72.50 points. The worst category was “Satisfaction with Responsiveness (waiting) in Medical Institutions”, at 33.54 points, summed up as “low”.

Even some Pakistani cities (Islamabad, Lahore) fared better than the Slovak capital, according to Numbeo.

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Topic: Health care


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