Judges are more powerful than ever before

The current Supreme Court battle in the US is a display of politics corrupting judicial independence, but it also shows how democracies are changing.

(Source: AP/TASR)

In the United States, the ugly process of confirming Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh has played out like a television soap opera, complete with serious allegations of sexual assault, tales of drunken parties, name-calling and anger. It is also an example how politicised judiciaries are becoming — and not only in America.

The whole concept of appointing judges — as opposed to electing them — is based on the idea of insulating them from politics. This is the case everywhere, not just the United States. In other words, judges aren’t supposed to make rulings to appeal to voters, help their preferred political party or attempt to make themselves popular, but interpret the law as it is written.

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Illustrative stock photo

More aggressive COVID strain probably dominant in Slovakia. It is not necessarily bad news

Virologists report they have found that the B.1.1.7 strain, first detected in the UK, is dominant in the samples from Trenčín.

23 h
Illustrative stock photo

News digest: Slovakia will receive more than 4 million vaccines

Schools will continue with distance education. Curfew will be applied on January 25 and 26 too.

23 h
Gabriel Šípoš

I receive more hate mail than I used to, says outgoing transparency watchdog director

Gabriel Šípoš leaves Transparency International Slovakia after 11 years. Slovakia has gone a long way in transparency, he says.

20. jan