Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

The Spitzenkandidat process is nonsensical and dishonest

Electing at least some MEPs on a cross-border basis, for example, would force candidates to articulate a vision for Europe, rather than count on preexisting party loyalties, to get elected.

Commissioner Maroš Šefčovič(Source: AP/SITA)

Statistics show that very few of you reading this will vote in next May’s European elections. Those who do vote are likely to support candidates from the party you support in domestic elections, with no thought that in voting for members of European Parliament (MEP) you are also impacting who will be the next leader of the EU’s executive branch, the European Commission.

Both things are bad for the future of the EU, and both need to change.

Amid consistent low turnouts for EU elections (just 13 percent of Slovaks voted in 2014), Brussels decided they needed to generate enthusiasm. Their innovation, five years ago, was the so-called Spitzenkandidaten process, whereby European Parliament party groupings nominate individual “candidates” for the EC presidency.

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Topic: Election


This article is also related to other trending topics: European Union

Top stories

Foreigners in Slovakia: Will they vote in upcoming elections?

Dutch activist after 13 years in Slovakia: I am still waiting to have a mayor who will translate the website of the city of Bratislava into English.

Illustrative Stock Photo

All for Jan: The year of magical thinking in Slovakia

Orbán used Soros as a powerful container for everything he stood against. Fico borrowed the ready-made narrative.

Jaguar Land Rover will ceremonially launch operations at its €1.4 bln Nitra plant next Thursday

Local trade unions and the carmaker have agreed on a wage rise even before the official launch of production.

The new Jaguar Land Rover plant in Nitra

Canada did it, so should everybody else

The burden of proof must now shift to those who oppose legalisation of marijuana.