AeroMobil requests type certificate

It aims to certify the first vehicle as a plane with a maximum takeoff weight lower than 1,200 kilograms.

AeroMobilAeroMobil(Source: Courtesy of AeroMobil)

The company AeroMobil has taken further important steps in the process of approving the airworthiness of its new test flying vehicle the AeroMobil 4.0. It has asked for a type certificate from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) that will enable the use of the vehicle in Europe in the future.

The company wants its car to be in compliance with the European regulations for car and air transport in the following years. It also wants to complete other flight and technical tests before launching production, the company informed in a press release.

The aim is to certify the first vehicle as a plane with the maximum takeoff weight of less than 1,200 kilograms. As part of the certification process, the technical and engineering side of the vehicle will be checked in detail and will have to meet EASA regulations for safety and airworthiness.

At the same time, AeroMobil has started construction of a new experimental prototype that will be ready for flight tests this year.

Read also:Slovak flying car will be available for purchase in 2020

“We’re glad that we’ve achieved this milestone in our schedule,” said Douglas MacAndrew, CTO of AeroMobil, as quoted in the press release.

The preparation of production in focus

Apart from development and testing, the company wants to focus on preparations for production in the following years.

“The construction of our flying car is a very complex, but also progressive process,” MacAndrew continued. “This is why EASA will be thorough when analysing our vehicle’s design. We’re ready for collaboration and proud of being able to technologically implement the best aspects of car and flight technology to one vehicle.”

The AeroMobil team is currently composed of more than 40 engineers and constructors from more than nine countries from across the globe who have together more than 400 years of experience in the flight and automotive industries. Many of them have developed and certified the most innovative sports cars and also the very first planes with electric engines.

Read also:Flying car impressed China

“When designing AeroMobil 4.0 we, of course, took into consideration the existing regulation framework for air space and roads, as well as the infrastructure for small planes and cars,” said Hugues Le Cardinal, head of airworthiness at AeroMobil, as quoted in the press release.

They are aware of the fact that in the case of vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft, the current regulations will have to be slightly rewritten. In this respect, they consider the way they have chosen to be rational and pragmatic and hope they will not have to wait for the new regulations.

“Safety both in the air and on the land is the highest priority for AeroMobil,” Hugues Le Cardinal continued. “We hope that the revolution in passenger transport will soon become reality and we will thus fulfil the desire of customers for real freedom of movement.”

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Theme: Automotive


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